Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see definitions for highlighted words…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Some important words in PEP Web articles are highlighted when you place your mouse pointer over them. Clicking on the words will display a definition from a psychoanalytic dictionary in a small window.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1962). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. IX, 1961: Some Ego Considerations in the Silent Patient. Leo S. Loomie. Pp. 56-78.. Psychoanal Q., 31:288-289.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. IX, 1961: Some Ego Considerations in the Silent Patient. Leo S. Loomie. Pp. 56-78.

(1962). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 31:288-289

Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. IX, 1961: Some Ego Considerations in the Silent Patient. Leo S. Loomie. Pp. 56-78.

The author describes three patients with chronic resistance manifested by silence. In each a crucial distortion in ego and superego development with distorted self-representations was demonstrated. Their failure to distinguish between word and action required silence as a defensive maneuver; silence was also employed whenever speech threatened their distorted but protective self-representation.

In a twenty-six-year-old woman who was unable to form a lasting relationship with a man, silence during analysis was a distance-effecting device which lessened the tension from her poorly integrated sadistic impulses and the fears of being similarly victimized. At times, when associated with her homosexual fantasy of crawling into the vagina of an admired acquaintance, her silence was a 'contented' one and expressed the archaic wish for the passive provision of satisfaction enjoyed in her preverbal period. At other times, her silence controlled

- 288 -

the excitation initiated by her own transference wishes, and sometimes its aim was to prevent revelations of her gloomy self-realizations of ineptitude and failure which underlay her precarious illusory grandiose self-image.

In another case suppression and repression of affects as well as total isolation and denial of Oedipal conflicts were prolonged by the patient's silence about his reactions to both his wife and his analyst. Like the first patient, his self-image was unrealistically superior.

A third patient considered her transference thoughts to be equivalent to her mother's promiscuity. Thus the threat of identification with the mother demanded denial and silence.

- 289 -

Article Citation

(1962). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. IX, 1961. Psychoanal. Q., 31:288-289

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.