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Kurth, G.M. (1962). Creative Variations in the Projective Techniques: By Molly Harrower, Ph.D., et al. Foreword by Bruno Klopfer. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas, 1960. 138 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 31:570-573.

(1962). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 31:570-573

Creative Variations in the Projective Techniques: By Molly Harrower, Ph.D., et al. Foreword by Bruno Klopfer. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas, 1960. 138 pp.

Review by:
Gertrud M. Kurth

Each of the three papers collected in this small volume offers a novel approach to the application of psychological tests transcending their original function as diagnostic instruments. In Projective Counseling, Molly Harrower presents a variety of techniques for making therapeutic use of raw test data in individual or group counseling. For instance, in short-term counseling an individual may be guided to focus associations on apparently significant or obviously pathological test responses. Structured material, such as intelligence test responses, can be implemented in student group counseling to clarify interference of emotional problems with intellectual processes. To explain to individuals their possibly deviant place on a normative chart of test responses may, according to Dr. Harrower, facilitate acceptance and utilization of their own assets and liabilities in a more realistic manner. Combinations and variations of these techniques have also been used successfully in marriage counseling to help partners understand and tolerate each other's different perceptions of, and reactions to, various life situations. The author emphasizes that, far from being short-cut measures, these procedures require high technical skill and experience in both diagnostic and therapeutic work, particularly since their main purpose is prevention rather than cure, so that judicious selection of patients is of prime importance. In other words, the method seems appropriate and useful in cases in which an intellectualizing, impersonal approach to a circumscribed problem and circumvention of transference reactions appear preferable.

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