Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review the bibliography…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

It is always useful to review an article’s bibliography and references to get a deeper understanding of the psychoanalytic concepts and theoretical framework in it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Trosman, H. (1981). Freud and his Patients. Volume II of the Downstate Psychoanalytic Institute's Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Series: Edited by Mark Kanzer, M.D., and Jules Glenn, M.D. New York/London: Jason Aronson, 1980. 452 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 50:260-262.

(1981). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 50:260-262

Freud and his Patients. Volume II of the Downstate Psychoanalytic Institute's Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Series: Edited by Mark Kanzer, M.D., and Jules Glenn, M.D. New York/London: Jason Aronson, 1980. 452 pp.

Review by:
Harry Trosman

This book, one of a series of four, is published in commemoration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of The Psychoanalytic Institute at New York University, which until 1979 was the Downstate Psychoanalytic Institute. This second volume of the series consists of twenty-eight papers written by members of the Institute and concerned with Freud's major case histories. There are five papers on Dora, three on Little Hans, seven on the Rat Man, six on Schreber, and six on the Wolf Man. Each case includes an integrative summary. There is an introductory chapter by Jules Glenn on pertinent psychoanalytic concepts as they are relevant to the cases and to Freud's countertransference. There is also a closing chapter by Mark Kanzer, summarizing the various papers.

Although occasional references are made to patients other than the subjects of the five major case histories (Katharina of Studies on Hysteria and the "homosexual woman of 1920" are referred to by Glenn in a paper on Freud's adolescent patients), the collectivity of Freud's patients is not the subject of this monograph. Nor does the book deal with the growing body of literature written by some of Freud's patients—Wortis, Kardiner, Grinker, etc.—which describes their treatment from the patient's point of view. Rather, the authors have largely confined their studies to what have come to be called the pillars upon which the psychoanalytic structure rests. Of the five major case reports, one concerned a child whom Freud did not directly treat, another concerned a psychotic man whom Freud never saw. Thus, in the strictest sense the book is about Freud, three psychoanalytic patients, and two others.

This narrowing of the view, however, takes nothing away from the usefulness of the book. By concentrating on the published case reports, the authors continue a tradition well established in psychoanalytic education.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.