Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To save articles in ePub format for your eBook reader…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To save an article in ePub format, look for the ePub reader icon above all articles for logged in users, and click it to quickly save the article, which is automatically downloaded to your computer or device. (There may be times when due to font sizes and other original formatting, the page may overflow onto a second page.).

You can also easily save to PDF format, a journal like printed format.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Gillman, R.D. (1987). Psychoanalysis: The Vital Issues. Vol. II: Clinical Psychoanalysis and its Applications: Edited by George H. Pollock, M.D., Ph.D. and John E. Gedo, M.D. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1984. 498 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 56:547-550.

(1987). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 56:547-550

Psychoanalysis: The Vital Issues. Vol. II: Clinical Psychoanalysis and its Applications: Edited by George H. Pollock, M.D., Ph.D. and John E. Gedo, M.D. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1984. 498 pp.

Review by:
Robert D. Gillman

This is the second volume of selected papers to come out of the conference that commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the Chicago Institute. The title of the book refers to the title of the conference, but it seems presumptuous here, since no effort has been made to delineate the vital issues, nor have the subjects been coherently related to each other. These comments are not meant to detract, however from the richness and originality of many of the individual papers.

Part I of the book contains four papers on transference and countertransference. Charles Kligerman provides a fine introduction. Jacob Arlow's paper on transference and interpretation lucidly relates them to conflict and compromise formation within the framework of structural theory. It is puzzling, therefore, that in Part II, "Self Psychology and Its Alternatives," the authors contrast self psychology with Freudian theory by referring only to Freud's prestructural writings. For example, David Terman constructs his view of mainstream analysis via references to the Introductory Lectures and the early case histories. In his paper, "The Analyst's Function in the Psychoanalytic Process," Terman asserts that the analyst, his interpretations, and the process itself serve as functions in the patient's inner experience, creating structure through the selfobject experience with the analyst. The care, concern, and empathy of the analyst become as significant as the interpretive content itself. However, his case example is not convincing. It seems to me that his sensitive, interpretive comments could have been made by a skilled analyst in either camp. We have to take his word for it that he served as a selfobject for the patient.

The assertion that "the mere presence of empathy … has a therapeutic effect" (p.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.