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Wilson, E., Jr. (1987). Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLVI, 1982: The Incapable Ego. Lack and Failure of the Après-coup. Augustin Jeanneau. Pp. 559-581.. Psychoanal Q., 56:591-592.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLVI, 1982: The Incapable Ego. Lack and Failure of the Après-coup. Augustin Jeanneau. Pp. 559-581.

(1987). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 56:591-592

Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLVI, 1982: The Incapable Ego. Lack and Failure of the Après-coup. Augustin Jeanneau. Pp. 559-581.

Emmett Wilson, Jr.

The après-coup must be something more than the subsequent organizing of an earlier situation in terms of sexual information and the threat of castration. Jeanneau believes that the reanimation of a scene that was not understood brings with it the memory of the powerlessness experienced earlier. This helplessness, this sense of dissolution, could be at the origin of the malaise, at the point where the ego fails with respect to its objects. The author emphasizes ego defect and narcissistic wound,

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and contrasts the case of Little Hans with that of the Wolf Man in thier modes of handling early traumatic experience. Hans was apparently able to rely on more solid images of his parents in his psychic makeup, whereas the Wolf Man experienced the early traumata with horror, uncertainty, and fear of fragmentation or dissolution, and fell into negativity, passivity, and paralysis of the ego. Is it appropriate to classify agoraphobia as a phobia or as an unconscious representation? Jeanneau would place this syndrome and hypochondria in a narcissistic context. In both, he believes, the ego is in a situation in which there is nothing frightening except for the intuition of its basic incapacity, of the sort that overtook the Wolf Man in the primal scene experience. There are difficult theoretical questions concerning how this narcissistic wound is attached to the representation but does not truly depend on it, as in the case of the Wolf Man. But the loss of sense of self is clear, since the Wolf Man, as a child of one year during the primal scene experience, was troubled not so much by what he saw, as that he was not seen; that his parents, who were usually so attentive, did not see him during an event from which he was excluded. Castration anxiety came much later, changed the affective significance of the scene, and gave a meaning to his passivity.

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Article Citation

Wilson, E., Jr. (1987). Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLVI, 1982. Psychoanal. Q., 56:591-592

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