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Wilson, E., Jr. (1987). Revue Française De Psychoanalyse. XLVI, 1982: The Beginnings of Psychoanalytic Training. Claude Girard. Pp. 911-936.. Psychoanal Q., 56:595-596.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Revue Française De Psychoanalyse. XLVI, 1982: The Beginnings of Psychoanalytic Training. Claude Girard. Pp. 911-936.

(1987). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 56:595-596

Revue Française De Psychoanalyse. XLVI, 1982: The Beginnings of Psychoanalytic Training. Claude Girard. Pp. 911-936.

Emmett Wilson, Jr.

The author studies the beginnings of psychoanalytic training as it is seen in Freud's texts, his correspondence, and the accounts of foreigners who came to Vienna for training. Freud confided to Wortis that he was only interested in an

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analysis for what he could learn from it. The theme of teaching and learning is frequent in Freud. Freud learned from his patients about the patient, about the theory, and about himself; he conducted his self-analysis in the course of analyzing patients. He felt that there is no serious self-analysis unless there is a dialogue with colleagues. Freud learned things about himself that he did not know, not by simple reminiscence, but by a creative process. Three axes, then, in Freud's training and education were 1) the evolution of a professional practice and clinical experience; 2) creative work upon himself associated with what he was conducting with his patients; and 3) a reworking after the fact of his modes of thought and his creative potentials. Training has this same tripod of supports: the effects of transmission, conceptual reworking, and personal change. Self-analysis is then nothing other than the means to personal integration, the pursuit of the process of investigation, and the openness to the unconscious inaugurated by the personal analysis.

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Article Citation

Wilson, E., Jr. (1987). Revue Française De Psychoanalyse. XLVI, 1982. Psychoanal. Q., 56:595-596

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