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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Hartman, J.J. (1987). Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XI, 1985: The Taming of the Deviants and Beyond: An Analysis of Dybbuk Possession and Exorcism in Judaism. Yoram Bilu. Pp. 1-32.. Psychoanal Q., 56:737.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XI, 1985: The Taming of the Deviants and Beyond: An Analysis of Dybbuk Possession and Exorcism in Judaism. Yoram Bilu. Pp. 1-32.

(1987). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 56:737

Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XI, 1985: The Taming of the Deviants and Beyond: An Analysis of Dybbuk Possession and Exorcism in Judaism. Yoram Bilu. Pp. 1-32.

John J. Hartman

Dybbuk refers to spirit possession among Jews and has been reported since the sixteenth century. This study was based on the analysis of sixty-three cases over four hundred years. The author discusses spirit possession in terms of individual motivation and societal restraints. He found that the dybbuk idiom provided a means by which forbidden sexual wishes could be symbolized and expressed in way that decreased their threat both to the individual and to the community. The author also found non-sexual forbidden desires expressed by dybbuk. Exorcism is discussed in terms of strengthening social conformity and reinforcing social control over deviance. Dybbuk phenomena appear in traditional communities which exert extensive control over their members. Those individuals who fill the social role of the one possessed are probably hysterics, he concludes. Dybbuk should be considered an example of a culture-specific syndrome.

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Article Citation [Who Cited This?]

Hartman, J.J. (1987). Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XI, 1985. Psychoanal. Q., 56:737

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