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Hartman, J.J. (1987). Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XI, 1985: Crisis and Continuity in the Personality of an Apache Shaman. L. Bryce Boyer; George A. DeVos; Ruth M. Boyer, Pp. 63-113.. Psychoanal Q., 56:738.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XI, 1985: Crisis and Continuity in the Personality of an Apache Shaman. L. Bryce Boyer; George A. DeVos; Ruth M. Boyer, Pp. 63-113.

(1987). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 56:738

Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XI, 1985: Crisis and Continuity in the Personality of an Apache Shaman. L. Bryce Boyer; George A. DeVos; Ruth M. Boyer, Pp. 63-113.

John J. Hartman

This paper deals with an Apache woman who became a shaman, a rare event in her culture. A Rorschach protocol was obtained two days after her first shamanistic performance, and a follow-up Rorschach was obtained two years later. Previous findings have been mixed regarding the role of psychopathology in shamans. In this case the first Rorschach indicated a preoccupation with homosexual conflict in an otherwise unusually rich and productive record. The test indicated both the positive and negative meanings of assuming the role of shaman for this woman. The second protocol indicated that the woman was now dealing with anxiety by emotional constriction, and the homosexual conflict had been repressed. Her shamanistic activity had gone well, but psychologically she was worse. She had assumed a social role which no woman had performed, and she ran the risk of supernatural retribution, social censure, and now repressed homosexual conflicts. Hers was now a more paranoid clinical picture. Since the woman was not psychotic before becoming a shaman, the authors view her as having experienced a "success psychosis."

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Article Citation

Hartman, J.J. (1987). Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XI, 1985. Psychoanal. Q., 56:738

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