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Goldberg, S.H. (1989). Contemporary Psychoanalysis. XXII, 1986: Clinical Issues Arising from a New Model of the Mind. Robert Langs. Pp. 418-444.. Psychoanal Q., 58:329-330.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Contemporary Psychoanalysis. XXII, 1986: Clinical Issues Arising from a New Model of the Mind. Robert Langs. Pp. 418-444.

(1989). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 58:329-330

Contemporary Psychoanalysis. XXII, 1986: Clinical Issues Arising from a New Model of the Mind. Robert Langs. Pp. 418-444.

Steven H. Goldberg

This paper presents an elaboration of further developments in Langs's interactive communicative approach. Langs differentiates between non-derivative messages, with their component manifest contents and implications, and derivative messages, with their component manifest contents, implications, and encoded meanings. Received messages are processed by the patient (or therapist) in one of two parallel but quite different systems. The Conscious System processes aspects of messages destined for unencoded conscious presentation, while the Deep Unconscious System processes aspects of messages which, because of their anxiety-producing nature, are not to receive undisguised representation in consciousness. In fact, messages processed by either system undergo an initial unconscious phase before representation in consciousness is effected. The Conscious System is oriented toward immediate needs for comfort and safety, while the Deep Unconscious System, in its processing of threatening aspects of messages, is guided by a search for truth. Though the latter system has superior capacities for discerning what is true, it sends its contents to consciousness only after transformation by processes of displacement, condensation, and symbolization. Intrapsychic conflict is seen as arising from the distinctive

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and opposing needs of the two systems. Madness (Langs's term for psychopathology of any sort) results from dysfunction of one or more of the sub-units of this proposed model for the processing of incoming messages. Langs criticizes much psychoanalytic work for dealing primarily with the Conscious System; he advocates a greater focus of attention to the workings and manifestations of the Deep Unconscious System.

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Article Citation

Goldberg, S.H. (1989). Contemporary Psychoanalysis. XXII, 1986. Psychoanal. Q., 58:329-330

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