Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To find an Author in a Video…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To find an Author in a Video, go to the Search Section found on the top left side of the homepage. Then, select “All Video Streams” in the Source menu. Finally, write the name of the Author in the “Search for Words or Phrases in Context” area and click the Search button.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Goldberg, S.H. (1989). Contemporary Psychoanalysis. XXII, 1986: Interpersonal Psychoanalysis: Its Roots and Its Contemporary Status (A Symposium). Gerard Chrzanowski; Edward Kasin; Stephen Mitchell. Pp. 445-466.. Psychoanal Q., 58:330.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Contemporary Psychoanalysis. XXII, 1986: Interpersonal Psychoanalysis: Its Roots and Its Contemporary Status (A Symposium). Gerard Chrzanowski; Edward Kasin; Stephen Mitchell. Pp. 445-466.

(1989). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 58:330

Contemporary Psychoanalysis. XXII, 1986: Interpersonal Psychoanalysis: Its Roots and Its Contemporary Status (A Symposium). Gerard Chrzanowski; Edward Kasin; Stephen Mitchell. Pp. 445-466.

Steven H. Goldberg

All three authors emphasize that the roots of Freudian psychoanalysis are intertwined with Freud's turn-of-the-century European cultural heritage, while the roots of the Sullivanian interpersonal concepts are embedded in the American pragmatic tradition of the period preceding and encompassing the major Sullivanian contributions. Both Chrzanowski and Kasin trace the important influences in Sullivan's thinking, including his relationships with pioneering thinkers in modern physics, anthropology, linguistics, and sociology. Mitchell argues that the major creative and influential contributions in the "post-Freudian" era have come from the "relational/structural" model, of which Sullivan was an early exponent. Contributions from the British object relations school and from certain thinkers within the American ego psychological tradition have been heavily influenced by this model. Interpersonal psychoanalysis is seen as having arisen as a corrective for certain weaknesses of traditional drive theory, with its relative lack of emphasis on what actually went on between patient and important others in the past and what actually goes on in the present between patient and analyst. All three authors point out that mainstream psychoanalytic thinking is coming increasingly close to many of the formulations of Sullivan and of the Interpersonal school.

- 330 -

Article Citation

Goldberg, S.H. (1989). Contemporary Psychoanalysis. XXII, 1986. Psychoanal. Q., 58:330

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.