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Werman, D.S. (1990). Addendum to the Review of Dr. Shirley Panken's Book, Virginia Woolf and the "Lust of Creation": A Psychoanalytic Exploration: Albany: State University of New York Press, 1987. 336 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 59:102.

(1990). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 59:102

Addendum to the Review of Dr. Shirley Panken's Book, Virginia Woolf and the "Lust of Creation": A Psychoanalytic Exploration: Albany: State University of New York Press, 1987. 336 pp.

Review by:
David S. Werman

It has been brought to my attention that in my review of Shirley Panken's Virginia Woolf and the "Lust of Creation" (see Vol. 58, 1989, pp. 131-134), I may have conveyed an erroneous impression in at least two significant areas. I would like to amend my initial comments at this time in order that Dr. Panken's valuable biography of Virginia Woolf—and her own clinical acumen—not be misjudged.

The first matter concerns my criticism of Dr. Panken's discussion of Woolf's depressions. From my review, it is possible that a reader might conclude that Dr. Panken is poorly informed about the nature of affective illnesses, their diagnosis, and their biological aspects. I do not mean to imply such a criticism of her. After a re-reading of Dr. Panken's book, I am confirmed in the judgment that such a criticism is not justified.

The second matter concerns what I described as her "bashing" of Leonard Woolf. Again, after re-reading her book, I find that my description erred in being an overstatement and that, in fact, Dr. Panken's treatment of Leonard Woolf was more cogent and less one-sided than I initially indicated.

I regret that my review may have led some readers to think ill of Dr. Panken's work, and, needless to say, I regret any distress it may have caused the author.

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