Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see papers related to the one you are viewing…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When there are articles or videos related to the one you are viewing, you will see a related papers icon next to the title, like this: RelatedPapers32Final3For example:

2015-11-06_09h28_31

Click on it and you will see a bibliographic list of papers that are related (including the current one). Related papers may be papers which are commentaries, responses to commentaries, erratum, and videos discussing the paper. Since they are not part of the original source material, they are added by PEP editorial staff, and may not be marked as such in every possible case.

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Grande, L.F. (1990). Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. XI, 1988: The Development of the Hero. Sigmund Freud and the Reformation of the Jewish Tradition. David S. Blatt. Pp. 639-703.. Psychoanal Q., 59:514.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. XI, 1988: The Development of the Hero. Sigmund Freud and the Reformation of the Jewish Tradition. David S. Blatt. Pp. 639-703.

(1990). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 59:514

Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. XI, 1988: The Development of the Hero. Sigmund Freud and the Reformation of the Jewish Tradition. David S. Blatt. Pp. 639-703.

Luke F. Grande

Blatt focuses on Freud's Jewishness, how it evolved, and how it affected his life, his thinking, and his professional determination. He discusses Judaism, noting that it is based on two contrasting but complementary attitudes: the antinomian, by which individuals relate to God directly and formulate their own notions, and the hierarchical, whereby people relate to God through social and communal structures. Blatt depicts the evolution of Judaism from the antinomian position personified by Jacob to the hierarchically structured society initiated by the Midianite priests and furthered by Moses, who is presented as actually embodying both forces. Blatt comments on social structure in which there is conflict between those who come first and have a direct connection with authority, and those who follow and must struggle to obtain power and autonomy. He closes by noting that Freud established a hierarchically oriented society, and whiled he dispensed with the rituals and dogmatism of religion, he remained true to the essence of Judaism propounded by Jacob in his struggle for individual freedom and responsibility, and that legacy has been passed down to succeeding generations of analysts.

- 514 -

Article Citation

Grande, L.F. (1990). Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. XI, 1988. Psychoanal. Q., 59:514

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.