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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Schukler, A.G. (1990). American Imago. XLV, 1988: Who Is Arnold Friend? The Other Self in Joyce Carol Oates's "Where Are You Going. Where Have You Been?" G. J. Weinberger. Pp. 205-215.. Psychoanal Q., 59:517.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: American Imago. XLV, 1988: Who Is Arnold Friend? The Other Self in Joyce Carol Oates's "Where Are You Going. Where Have You Been?" G. J. Weinberger. Pp. 205-215.

(1990). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 59:517

American Imago. XLV, 1988: Who Is Arnold Friend? The Other Self in Joyce Carol Oates's "Where Are You Going. Where Have You Been?" G. J. Weinberger. Pp. 205-215.

Anita G. Schukler

The concept of the double, demonstrated in fictional characters by Poe, Conrad, and Crane, and studied from a psychoanalytic perspective by Otto Rank, reappears in Connie, the creation of Joyce Carol Oates. connie's "double" is Arnold Friend, who represents clusters of unconscious feelings, wishes, and identifications. A. Friend (Arnold) exemplifies the "imaginary friend" sometimes described by young children. This figure, a representation of unconscious wishes, embodies elements of superego and ego ideal as well. When preoedipal and oedipal conflicts re-emerge at puberty, the "friend" may be an idealized peer. The process of idealization and de-idealization is part of the work of adolescence, and the Oates story underscores the essential conflicts with which one wrestles, and the fact that "each person must undergo the rites of passage alone."

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Article Citation

Schukler, A.G. (1990). American Imago. XLV, 1988. Psychoanal. Q., 59:517

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