Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: PEP-Web Archive subscribers can access past articles and books…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

If you are a PEP-Web Archive subscriber, you have access to all journal articles and books, except for articles published within the last three years, with a few exceptions.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Coates, S. (1994). Ethology: Primate Separation Models of Affective Disorders. S. J. Suomi. In Neurobiology of Learning, Emotion and Affect, ed. John Madden IV. New York: Raven Press, 1991. Pp. 195-214.. Psychoanal Q., 63:168-169.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Ethology: Primate Separation Models of Affective Disorders. S. J. Suomi. In Neurobiology of Learning, Emotion and Affect, ed. John Madden IV. New York: Raven Press, 1991. Pp. 195-214.

(1994). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 63:168-169

Ethology: Primate Separation Models of Affective Disorders. S. J. Suomi. In Neurobiology of Learning, Emotion and Affect, ed. John Madden IV. New York: Raven Press, 1991. Pp. 195-214.

Susan Coates

Infant primates when separated from their mothers show a pattern of protest, followed by resignation and depression, including the neurochemical transformations that typically occur in depression which are strikingly similar to the pattern

- 168 -

found in human beings. Early separation from the mother predisposes primates at older ages to a condition that appears to be analogous to human anaclitic depression.

Suomi conducted a series of remarkable experiments in which he bred Bonnet monkeys to be highly reactive to separation, and a contrasting group to be low reactives. He conceptualized these differences as reflecting stable underlying neurophysiological reactivity. These temperamental styles have been demonstrated to be highly stable over long periods of development in those animals that are at the extremes of the continuum (the upper and lower 20%). High reactives are sensitive even to those species specific behaviors of the mother, such as leaving to mate, and they remained reactive to separation over their life course.

- 169 -

Article Citation

Coates, S. (1994). Ethology. Psychoanal. Q., 63:168-169

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.