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Seligman, S. (1994). Infant Observation: The Contribution of Mother-Infant Mutual Influence to the Origins of Self- and Object-Representations. B. Beebe and F. M. Lachmann. Psychoanalytic Psychology. V, 1988. Pp. 305-337.. Psychoanal Q., 63:397-397.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Infant Observation: The Contribution of Mother-Infant Mutual Influence to the Origins of Self- and Object-Representations. B. Beebe and F. M. Lachmann. Psychoanalytic Psychology. V, 1988. Pp. 305-337.

(1994). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 63:397-397

Infant Observation: The Contribution of Mother-Infant Mutual Influence to the Origins of Self- and Object-Representations. B. Beebe and F. M. Lachmann. Psychoanalytic Psychology. V, 1988. Pp. 305-337.

Stephen Seligman

Mother-infant interaction is characterized in terms of patterns of mutual influence, although these patterns are not necessarily symmetrical. Since these patterns are typically recurrent, they are generalized as "expectancies [which are] characteristic patterns that the infant recognizes, expects and predicts"; these structures are understood as "interactive representations." These social representations provide a basic context for the development of experiences of self and other, which are developed simultaneously. The authors propose that these processes be combined with other models of psychic structure development "to yield a fuller picture of the complexity of the early organization of experience."

The specific nature of these patterns is demonstrated through direct observation of mother-infant interactions. Split-screen films and videotapes that simultaneously show the mother's and the infant's facial and bodily reactions during interactions are carefully timed and dramatically reflect specific patterns of interaction. Both "matches" and "derailments" between infants and parents can be observed in detail. The article includes useful photographic reproductions.

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Article Citation [Who Cited This?]

Seligman, S. (1994). Infant Observation. Psychoanal. Q., 63:397-397

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