Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To zoom in or out on PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Are you having difficulty reading an article due its font size? In order to make the content on PEP-Web larger (zoom in), press Ctrl (on Windows) or ⌘Command (on the Mac) and the plus sign (+). Press Ctrl (on Windows) or ⌘Command (on the Mac) and the minus sign (-) to make the content smaller (zoom out). To go back to 100% size (normal size), press Ctrl (⌘Command on the Mac) + 0 (the number 0).

Another way on Windows: Hold the Ctrl key and scroll the mouse wheel up or down to zoom in and out (respectively) of the webpage. Laptop users may use two fingers and separate them or bring them together while pressing the mouse track pad.

Safari users: You can also improve the readability of you browser when using Safari, with the Reader Mode: Go to PEP-Web. Right-click the URL box and select Settings for This Website, or go to Safari > Settings for This Website. A large pop-up will appear underneath the URL box. Look for the header that reads, “When visiting this website.” If you want Reader mode to always work on this site, check the box for “Use Reader when available.”

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Wangh, M. (1994). Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel. V-Vi (Special Issue), 1992: Modes of Transgenerational Transmission of the Trauma of Nazi Persecution and their Appearance in Treatment. Ludwig Haesler. Pp. 51-60.. Psychoanal Q., 63:610.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel. V-Vi (Special Issue), 1992: Modes of Transgenerational Transmission of the Trauma of Nazi Persecution and their Appearance in Treatment. Ludwig Haesler. Pp. 51-60.

(1994). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 63:610

Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel. V-Vi (Special Issue), 1992: Modes of Transgenerational Transmission of the Trauma of Nazi Persecution and their Appearance in Treatment. Ludwig Haesler. Pp. 51-60.

Martin Wangh

Haesler, a non-Jewish German psychoanalyst, describes how painful it is to endure the countertransference experience in treating survivors or their offspring. The Holocaust trauma cannot be categorized under the usual labels of neurosis or mourning. The danger of an explosion of immeasurable pain upon memory is just too great. One way of obtaining some relief comes by delegating the trauma to the next generation. The offspring feel that to refuse to accept this trauma would be to murder the parents. So during treatment, such role assignments have to be accepted by the analyst, who is seen as a selfobject, that is, as someone who is such a murderer. In submitting to such assignment, the analyst becomes a self-hating German. Only constant self-analysis offers salvation, not only for the analyst, but also for the course and outcome of the analysis. The analyst's endurance makes the pathology of the survivors endurable to the second generation. The more guilt, rage, sadness, horror, hatred, and grief the analyst is able to withstand, the more the patient learns to integrate that which he or she could not integrate as a child.

- 610 -

Article Citation

Wangh, M. (1994). Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel. V-Vi (Special Issue), 1992. Psychoanal. Q., 63:610

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.