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Fountain, G. (2000). Psychoanalysis in Transition? What Must Be Taught and What Must Be Learned? Annelise Heigl-Evers. Pp. 332-345.. Psychoanal Q., 69(1):186.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychoanalysis in Transition? What Must Be Taught and What Must Be Learned? Annelise Heigl-Evers. Pp. 332-345.

(2000). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 69(1):186

Forum Der Psychoanalyse. X, 4, 1994

Psychoanalysis in Transition? What Must Be Taught and What Must Be Learned? Annelise Heigl-Evers. Pp. 332-345.

Gerard Fountain

A brief outline of the essential features of psychotherapy and its origins is followed by a survey of the two lines along which psychoanalytic therapy has evolved: on the one hand, traditional individual analysis with frequent sessions over a long period of time, and on the other hand, the wide-ranging application of psychological principles with differentiated and adaptive indications. There is a description of how the variations that have arisen relate to the form of organization, the setting, the therapeutic techniques, and the means of communication. A brief account is given of the development of psychoanalytic training, particularly as described in the publications of Balint and Ekstein. On the basis of the evolution and current status of psychoanalysis, recommendations are made as to the future training of analysts, with reference to the special importance of supervised analysis as a means of intensifying self-experience in addition to its other benefits. There is emphasis on the necessity of self-experience in psychoanalytic techniques that make use of nonverbal means of communication, such as body feeling and creative activity. Finally, self-experience of the therapist's communication via facial expressions and gestures is recommended, as is social-psychological/group-dynamic self-experience in specially designed training courses. The narrow practice of psychoanalysis/psychotherapy, concentrating as it does on the traditional long-term, high-frequency process, urgently needs to be broadened by the introduction or emphasis on these modifications, which should form a more important part of training programs than has hitherto been the case.

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Article Citation

Fountain, G. (2000). Psychoanalysis in Transition? What Must Be Taught and What Must Be Learned?. Psychoanal. Q., 69(1):186

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