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Altmeyer, M. (2001). Psyche.: LIV, 1, 2000: Narzißus, Intersubjektivität une Anerkennung.. Psychoanal Q., 70(2):513.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psyche.: LIV, 1, 2000: Narzißus, Intersubjektivität une Anerkennung.

(2001). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 70(2):513

Psyche.: LIV, 1, 2000: Narzißus, Intersubjektivität une Anerkennung.

Martin Altmeyer

Narcissism, Intersubjectivity, Recognition points out that, traditionally, narcissism is understood as synonymous with self-love and egocentricity; drive theory defines it as the libidinous cathexis of the self. The author casts doubt on this view of what is not only a central psychoanalytic concept, but also one that has found its way into everyday language. Instead, he proposes an intersubjective definition: narcissism originates in the mirror of the object. A narcissistic disturbance is an unconscious “battle for recognition” (Hegel). A Winnicott-inspired model of the intersubjective genesis of self, further elaborated by Bollas and Ogden, forms the basis for this interdisciplinary approach, combining Freud's definition of narcissism as “being loved,” developmental theory in infant research, the symbolic and interactionalistic concept of adoption of perspective (Mead), and the sociophilosophical theory of recognition (Honneth, Benjamin). The central thesis is that it is only under the paradigm of intersubjectivity that the notorious contradictions of the psychoanalytic concept of narcissism can be resolved.

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Article Citation

Altmeyer, M. (2001). Psyche.: LIV, 1, 2000. Psychoanal. Q., 70(2):513

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