Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review the glossary of psychoanalytic concepts…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Prior to searching for a specific psychoanalytic concept, you may first want to review PEP Consolidated Psychoanalytic Glossary edited by Levinson. You can access it directly by clicking here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Jones, B.P. (2001). Who's That Girl? Who's That Boy?: Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory: Lynne Layton, Ph.D. Northvale, NJ: Aronson, 1998. 268 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 70(4):905-907.

(2001). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 70(4):905-907

Who's That Girl? Who's That Boy?: Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory: Lynne Layton, Ph.D. Northvale, NJ: Aronson, 1998. 268 pp.

Review by:
Barbara P. Jones

In Who's That Girl? Who's That Boy?: Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory, Layton sets out to explore the tensions between postmodern theories of gender and relational psychoanalytic theory (object relations, intersubjective theory, self psychology, and relational conflict theory). She is clearly superbly qualified to take on this task, demonstrating a firm and nuanced grasp of postmodern theory, as well as a comfortable command of the varieties of relational analytic theory. Add to this a clear, unpretentious writing style and an interest in a wide range of cultural products—film, books, pop music, and videos—and the result is an unusual, hearty, and stimulating read.

Layton is primarily interested in something that relational feminists and postmodern feminists have in common:

I want to argue that all of them are interested in gender identity formation only as it informs a larger project: to ground the possibility of a fluid, agentic, heterogeneous self that recognizes its own multiplicity (gendered and otherwise), that does not defensively foreclose on its own (or another's) multiplicity, and that can recognize and be recognized by an other both like and different from the self…. my sense is that what their projects have in common is their search for a way out of the narcissistic binds that sexism and other forms of oppression impose. [p. 31]

Indeed, the title of the second chapter, “Beyond Narcissism: Toward a Negotiation Model of Gender Identity,” might serve as the book's subtitle.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.