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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Buckers, M.J. Helsen, W.F. (2001). Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior; XXXVI, 4, 2000: Vision and Laterality: Does Occlusion Disclose a Feedback Processing Advantage for the Right-Hand System?. Psychoanal Q., 70(4):925-926.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior; XXXVI, 4, 2000: Vision and Laterality: Does Occlusion Disclose a Feedback Processing Advantage for the Right-Hand System?

(2001). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 70(4):925-926

Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior; XXXVI, 4, 2000: Vision and Laterality: Does Occlusion Disclose a Feedback Processing Advantage for the Right-Hand System?

Martinus J. Buckers and Werner F. Helsen

The main purpose of this study was to examine whether manual asymmetries could be related to the superiority of the left-hemisphere/right-hand system in processing visual feedback. Subjects were tested when performing single (Experiment 1) and reciprocal (Experiment 2) aiming movements under different vision conditions (full vision, 20 ms. on/180 ms. off, 10/90, 40/160, 20/80, 60/120, 20/40). Although in both experiments, right-hand advantages were found, manual asymmetries did not interact with intermittent vision conditions. Similar patterns of results were noted across vision

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conditions for both hands. These data do not support the visual feedback processing hypothesis of manual asymmetry. Motor performance is affected to the same extent for both hand systems when vision is degraded.

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Article Citation

Buckers, M.J. and Helsen, W.F. (2001). Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior; XXXVI, 4, 2000. Psychoanal. Q., 70(4):925-926

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