Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To view citations for the most cited journals…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Statistics of the number of citations for the Most Cited Journal Articles on PEP Web can be reviewed by clicking on the “See full statistics…” link located at the end of the Most Cited Journal Articles list in the PEP tab.

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

van der Heide, D.J. (2010). An Integrative Approach: Competing Theories of Interpretation. By Robert Hooberman. Lanham, MA: Rowman and Littlefield Publishing Group, 2008. 153 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 79(1):273-277.

(2010). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 79(1):273-277

An Integrative Approach: Competing Theories of Interpretation. By Robert Hooberman. Lanham, MA: Rowman and Littlefield Publishing Group, 2008. 153 pp.

Review by:
Douglas J. van der Heide

It is with great interest that I have read Robert Hooberman's most recent book, and there is much to recommend it. Notwithstanding the title, the author's aim is to demonstrate that a melding of classical theory and object relations in approaching the patient is both possible and optimal. As we all know, since the beginning of our science, psychoanalytic theorizing has resulted in repeated “splits”; shifts in theoretical focus, combined with the disruptive effects of political and social allegiances within institutes have led to bitter disagreement and ultimately the formation of new schools of psychoanalysis, as Rangell has pointed out.

Proliferating therapeutic and theoretical perspectives have been difficult for beginning psychoanalysts to integrate into their work. This frequently has resulted in either an inflexible adherence to one theory and technique, or the stance that “anything goes.” Early on in this short book, Hooberman states his belief that “the unique contributions of seemingly competing theories need not necessarily compete at all; my effort in this book is to show how apparently different aspects of the psyche can be addressed together” (p. 4). Although there may not always be agreement with his particular recipe for doing this, his clinical material and explications of his technique are valuable and worthwhile.

Because

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.