Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To use Evernote for note taking…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Evernote is a general note taking application that integrates with your browser. You can use it to save entire articles, bookmark articles, take notes, and more. It comes in both a free version which has limited synchronization capabilities, and also a subscription version, which raises that limit. You can download Evernote for your computer here. It can be used online, and there’s an app for it as well.

Some of the things you can do with Evernote:

  • Save search-result lists
  • Save complete articles
  • Save bookmarks to articles

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Richards, A. (2018). A Cultural Citizen of the World: Sigmund Freud's Knowledge and use of British and American Writings: By S. S. Prawer. Abingdon, UK / New York: Modern Humanities Research Association / Routledge, 2009. 156 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 87(2):383-387.
    

(2018). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 87(2):383-387

A Cultural Citizen of the World: Sigmund Freud's Knowledge and use of British and American Writings: By S. S. Prawer. Abingdon, UK / New York: Modern Humanities Research Association / Routledge, 2009. 156 pp.

Review by:
Arnold Richards

That Freud studied and was influenced by both Shakespeare and John Stuart Mill is well known, but Freud's Anglophilia—which began in his teens—and his interest in and love of many other British and American authors is less known. Therefore, A Cultural Citizen of the World: Sigmund Freud's Knowledge and Use of British and American Writings, by S. S. Prawer, is an important contribution to Freud's historiography.

Freud had always wanted to be a part of the thought collective of cultured and educated Viennese and Germans and to share in their thought style. He worked hard at the gymnasium to which his father sent him so that he could acquire the educational bona fides of Viennese society. This required the acquisition of Bildung, the self-cultivation ideal institutionalized by Wilhelm von Humboldt in the German-speaking countries during the nineteenth century. To this end, Freud studied Latin and Greek, and he read Cervantes as well as the great figures of the German Enlightenment, Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, and Heine.

Freud's English-language influences included the scientists John Tyndall, Thomas Huxley, Charles Lyell, Charles Darwin, and Norman Lockyer; the philosophers Bacon, Locke, and Hume; the anthropologists Sir James Fraser and Arthur Evans; the statesman Benjamin Disraeli; the economists Adam Smith and Thomas Malthus; and the Scottish historian of religion William Robertson Smith. Some of these names are familiar to us all from our reading of Freud's applied analytic work, including Totem and Taboo, Civilization and Its Discontents, Moses and Monotheism, and Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego.

The list of poets, novelists, and other contributors to the humanities whom Freud read and admired is also very long.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.