Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To search for a specific phrase…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Did you write an article’s title and the article did not appear in the search results? Or do you want to find a specific phrase within the article? Go to the Search section and write the title or phrase surrounded by quotations marks in the “Search for Words or Phrases in Context” area.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Cavell, M. (2018). Learning about Human Nature and Analytic Technique from Mothers and Babies: By Nara Amalia Caron and Rita Sobreira Lopes. London: Karnac Books, 2014. 282 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 87(2):390-392.

(2018). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 87(2):390-392

Learning about Human Nature and Analytic Technique from Mothers and Babies: By Nara Amalia Caron and Rita Sobreira Lopes. London: Karnac Books, 2014. 282 pp.

Review by:
Marcia Cavell

In 1936, Esther Bick, a contemporary of Winnicott's, wrote her doctoral dissertation on the development of twins, which instilled in her the belief that in order to understand the development of the human personality, she should study the daily life of the infant in its home environment. This led to the method of infant observation that was then developed by the authors of this volume and Daniel Stern, among others.

Nara Amalia Caron is a medical doctor and a child, adolescent, and adult psychoanalyst; Rita Sobreira Lopes teaches developmental psychology. The psychoanalytic method of infant observation is “a royal road to the primitive in human beings,” they write, and an opportunity for analysts treating people at any age to develop the sensitive listening capacities necessary “to establish contact with the psychic phenomena of early life” (p. 7). But the beauty of their book is that they extend Bick's method, via sonograms, to intrauterine development, and the reactions to it of the prospective parents. The book consists largely of narratives that follow six infants, two singles and two sets of twins, from gestation through the third year of life.

The authors reveal a world that is at once familiar and eerily strange.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.