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Richards, A.D. (2018). Koellreuter: What is this Professor Freud Like?: A Diary of an Analysis with Historical Comments (A. D. Richards). Psychoanal Q., 87(4):886-890.

(2018). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 87(4):886-890

Koellreuter: What is this Professor Freud Like?: A Diary of an Analysis with Historical Comments (A. D. Richards)

Review by:
Arnold D. Richards

Anna Koellreuter, Ph.D. is a psychoanalyst and clinical psychologist who practices in Zurich, Switzerland and writes about the analysis of women by women and other feminist psychoanalytic subjects. Her grandmother Anne Guggenbuhl traveled from Switzerland to Vienna in 1921 for psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud, four months of six times weekly sessions for a total of 80 sessions. More than 28 years ago, seven years after her grandmother died, a letter from Freud to Anne Guggenbuhl, which discusses the conditions for the analysis, was discovered. And shortly after the letter was discovered the diary was found as well. The book tells the story of the diary, includes the diary itself (93 pages), visual material relating to Anna Guggenbuhl’s life, notes by the author about the analytic process, and comments by Karl Fallend, Ernst Falzader, and Andre Haynal.

Karl Fallend is a professor of social psychology at the August Aichorn Institute in Graz, Austria, who wrote about the history of psychoanalysis, and its rapid development after World War I. He refers to the triad of “internalization, institutionalism, and professionalism of psychoanalysis” in the early 1920s, which also followed the ascendancy of Austro-Marxism in Red Vienna.

The mass movements of these revolutionary times also concerned Freud, who was probably working on Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego during Anna Guggenbuhl’s analysis. Fallend believed that Anna Guggenbuhl went to Vienna not only to be treated by the famous Freud but also because “she could expect to meet with more tolerance, understanding and openness for the particular problems there” (p. 78).

He

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