Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see author affiliation information in an article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To see author affiliation and contact information (as available) in an article, simply click on the Information icon next to the author’s name in every journal article.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Gay, V.P. (1992). Freud's Moses: Judaism Terminable and Interminable by Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1991, xix + 159 pp., $25.00. Psa. Books, 3(2):247-251.

(1992). Psychoanalytic Books, 3(2):247-251

Freud's Moses: Judaism Terminable and Interminable by Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1991, xix + 159 pp., $25.00

Review by:
Volney P. Gay, Ph.D.

Even at the end of his life Freud wrote seminal pieces. In the last textual volume of the Standard Edition, volume 23, we find major essays on the theory of mind (An Outline of Psychoanalysis [1940]), the nature of psychotherapy (“Analysis Terminable and Interminable [1937],” “Constructions in Analysis [1937],” and “Splitting of the Ego in the Process of Defense [1940]”) and the psychology of religion, Moses and Monotheism (Freud, 1939). Of these three types of essay, each reflecting numerous predecessors in Freud's long career, the first two quickly entered the mainstream of psychoanalytic reflection. Although unfinished, An Outline contains valuable instances in which Freud rethought his metapsychological principles, his basic theory of the mind, which he was yet quite willing to revise, contrary to exaggerated reports of his demand for orthodoxy. The papers on psychotherapeutic technique, especially his comments on splitting, are vital, frequently cited, and integrated into the scientific fabric of psychoanalysis, particularly object relations theory. In contrast, the fate of Moses and Monotheism, Freud's “historical novel” in which he imaginatively reconstructed the origin of the Jews, met with embarrassed acceptance or absolute rejection, often mixed with vilification of Freud's mind and intentions.

Yosef

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.