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Reichbart, R. (2001). Psychoanalyses/Feminisms: Peter L. Rudnytsky and Andrew M. Gordon (Eds.), Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1999, 237 pp., $17.95.That Obscure Subject of Desire: Freud's Female Homosexual Revisited, by Ronnie C. Lesser and Erica Schoenberg (Eds.), New York: Routledge, 1999, 265 pp., $19.95.Who's that Girl? Who's that Boy? Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory, by Lynne Layton, Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1999, 267 pp., $30.00.. Psychoanal. Psychol., 18(3):612-622.

(2001). Psychoanalytic Psychology, 18(3):612-622

Psychoanalyses/Feminisms: Peter L. Rudnytsky and Andrew M. Gordon (Eds.), Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1999, 237 pp., $17.95.That Obscure Subject of Desire: Freud's Female Homosexual Revisited, by Ronnie C. Lesser and Erica Schoenberg (Eds.), New York: Routledge, 1999, 265 pp., $19.95.Who's that Girl? Who's that Boy? Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory, by Lynne Layton, Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1999, 267 pp., $30.00.

Review by:
Richard Reichbart, Ph.D.

Arising from the area of gender and sexuality, a revolution is taking place within psychoanalysis, one that has been developing for years and has recently burst forth more fully. It has spawned a landmark 1996 supplementary volume of the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association; two new journals on gender and sexuality; and innumerable books, presentations, and articles. Generally, established institutes seem unaware of this revolution in a formal sense and have yet to change their required curriculums to accommodate it. Many male psychoanalysis, to judge by their lack of attendance at psychology-of-women or gender-related presentations or study groups, appear resistant, unaware that these changes will ultimately affect not only the way in which psychoanalysts think about women but about men.

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