Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To open articles without exiting the current webpage…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To open articles without exiting your current search or webpage, press Ctrl + Left Mouse Button while hovering over the desired link. It will open in a new Tab in your internet browser.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ginot, E. (2007). Intersubjectivity and Neuroscience: Understanding Enactments and Their Therapeutic Significance Within Emerging Paradigms. Psychoanal. Psychol., 24(2):317-332.

(2007). Psychoanalytic Psychology, 24(2):317-332

Intersubjectivity and Neuroscience: Understanding Enactments and Their Therapeutic Significance Within Emerging Paradigms

Efrat Ginot, Ph.D.

Evolving views of enactments as interpersonal manifestations of dissociated relational styles are increasingly finding support in attachment studies and neuro scientific research. Understanding enactments as an aspect of the intersubjective process and as the ultimate communicators of the patient's neurally encoded early experiences, this paper examines what enactments convey, and explores their interpersonal and neural underpinnings. Unconsciously triggered and communicated within the intersubjective interaction, enactments reveal the participants' implicit, neurally encoded relational and emotional patterns that inevitably come alive within the analytic dyad. It is suggested that the analyst's eventual self-awareness of her own participation, followed by self-disclosure of her experience, promote a conscious, verbally articulated encounter with the patient's unconscious relational styles, creating opportunities for emotional and neural integration.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.