Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To quickly go to the Table of Volumes from any article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To quickly go to the Table of Volumes from any article, click on the banner for the journal at the top of the article.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Brink, L. (1915). Dreams and Myths. By Dr. Karl Abraham. Translated by Dr. W. A. White. Nervous and Mental Disease Monograph Series, No. 15. Nervous and Mental Disease Publishing Co., New York. $1.00.. Psychoanal. Rev., 2(2):236-238.

(1915). Psychoanalytic Review, 2(2):236-238

Dreams and Myths. By Dr. Karl Abraham. Translated by Dr. W. A. White. Nervous and Mental Disease Monograph Series, No. 15. Nervous and Mental Disease Publishing Co., New York. $1.00.

Review by:
L. Brink

Freud's study of the dream having given us a clear understanding of those complexes lying in the unconscious, which breaking through cause mental disturbances, such a work as this one before us serves to throw further illumination upon such knowledge and understanding. Dr. White has here translated and presented a most important aid to psychoanalytic work.

Abraham reviews succinctly Freud's theories of infantile sexuality and repression, and of the fulfillment in dreams of wishes arising out of the repressed material, through that symbolism which conceals the true wish and its sexual character from the censorship of consciousness. A few typical dreams, he reminds us, appear, as do the œdipus myth and some others, with but little symbolic clothing, for they seem so preposterous that the censor fails to recognize them as containing a wish fulfillment. In general, however, in dream and in myth, a symbolic guise must be pierced before the true content may be understood. Abraham has taken two principal myths, that of Prometheus and the origin of fire, and the closely related myth of the origin of nectar, and subjected these to careful analysis and comparison with the dream. The myth he shows is a racial, psychical product analogous to the dream for the individual. Following the work of Kuhn he traces the Greek legend further back among the Indogermanic peoples where are found the deeper layers of the myth in the earlier infantile phantasies of the race.

The dream contains often an apparent wish beneath which lies the concealed wish that reaches back into infantile sexual material. For the sexual both in the infancy of the individual and of the race is the strongest impulse and therefore receives the strongest repression. It is in this Prometheus saga that we can see these various stages of repression and sublimation and find the several strata of the fulfilled wishes.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.