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Tip: To sort articles by author…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

While performing a search, you can sort the articles by Author in the Search section. This will rearrange the results of your search alphabetically according to the author’s surname. This feature is useful to quickly locate the work of a specific author.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1934). The Sign of Babinski: A Study of the Evolution of Cortical Dominance in Primates. By John F. Fulton and Allen D. Keller. Published by Charles G. Thomas. Springfield, 111., and Baltimore, Md., 1932. Pp. 165. Price $5.00.. Psychoanal. Rev., 21(4):477.

(1934). Psychoanalytic Review, 21(4):477

The Sign of Babinski: A Study of the Evolution of Cortical Dominance in Primates. By John F. Fulton and Allen D. Keller. Published by Charles G. Thomas. Springfield, 111., and Baltimore, Md., 1932. Pp. 165. Price $5.00.

This very fine monograph is a study of the nature and clinical significance of the Babinski sign and other related pathological reflexes of the lower extremities in the higher primates. It is of no special interest primarily to readers of this journal, except that perhaps they say that in the early work on the theory of spastic cerebral diplegia Freud's theory is “of first importance.” There are certain general matters with which they deal that are of importance to all. From the experimental work the authors pass to the discussion of cortical dominance in the evolutionary history of the human central nervous system, and they close their work with a caution which should be borne in mind by all who deal particularly with problems of the nervous system. They say “Not only have levels of function become modified in the higher members of the primate scale, but one also can detect in the cerebral hemispheres the appearance of a more precise localization of function than in the lower forms. That a rat or a dog recovers the faculty of visual discrimination after removal of the occipital cortex does not constitute a reason for believing that man can make a similar adaptation. If, however, one compares corresponding lesions in a series of animals representing different stages of evolution of the central nervous system, it may then be safe, but only then, to predict the consequences of similar lesions of the human brain.”

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