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(1935). A Hundred Years of Psychology, 1833-1933. By J. C. Fliigel, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University College, London. New York: The Macmillan Co., 1933. Pp. 362, plus Bibliography, Chronological Table of Events, and Index.. Psychoanal. Rev., 22(2):239.

(1935). Psychoanalytic Review, 22(2):239

A Hundred Years of Psychology, 1833-1933. By J. C. Fliigel, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University College, London. New York: The Macmillan Co., 1933. Pp. 362, plus Bibliography, Chronological Table of Events, and Index.

This little book is a systematic review of the past hundred years of psychology, beginning with Herbart and ending with psychology as an accepted science. The study is divided into four parts, the first part comprising a review of psychology as it was in 1833, in which are given interesting chapters on phrenology, early physiological psychology, Mesmerism, and abnormal psychology. Then the first period, ‘33-’60, carries these various studies forward, including physiological psychology, hypnotism, and abnormal psychology. In the second period, ‘60-1900, there are the beginnings of the influence of evolution through the writings of Darwin and Spencer, of animal psychology, the work of Galton, child psychology, the great textbooks, Wundt, Ebbinghaus and others, and the development of abnormal psychology in France. The fourth and final period, 1900-’33, discusses the modern schools, particularly configurationism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, and an excellent chapter on Spearman and the “Factor” school. The book ends with a discussion of psychology with relation to sociology, anthropology, education and industry, and the present position of psychology.

The book is packed with information clearly written and gives an admirable idea of the gradual evolution of psychology as a science, from its early beginnings to its present status, with some idea of the direction of existing trends. It can be highly recommended.

Lewis

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