Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To quickly return from a journal’s Table of Contents to the Table of Volumes…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can return with one click from a journal’s Table of Contents (TOC) to the Table of Volumes simply by clicking on “Volume n” at the top of the TOC (where n is the volume number).

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Kaplan, L.J. (1969). Children of Time and Space, of Action and Impulse. Rudolf Ekstein. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1966. x + 466 pp.. Psychoanal. Rev., 56B(2):344-345.

(1969). Psychoanalytic Review, 56B(2):344-345

Book Reviews

Children of Time and Space, of Action and Impulse. Rudolf Ekstein. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1966. x + 466 pp.

Review by:
Louise J. Kaplan

The children of time and space, action and impulse are the psychotic and borderline child patients treated by Rudolf Ekstein and his colleagues at the Southard School in Illinois and at the Reiss-Davis Child Study Center in Los Angeles. This book is the result of two decades of clinical research on psychoanalytic treatment procedures with these children. Typical of Ekstein is a lively collaboration with colleagues, and various sections of his present book are joint endeavors. Also, several sections have appeared earlier in various publications. Thus, Children of Time and Space, of Action and Impulse is a kind of cumulative report from a notable quarter of the professional community.

Among Ekstein's hopes for this publication is that the pioneering efforts in the psychoanalytic treatment of psychotic children can “be tested and can move from the realm of the miracle cure, by especially intuitive psychotherapists, to one of a transmittable treatment technique, which is based on a clear rationale and verifiable predictions.”

Anyone who treats severely disturbed children is familiar with the unfortunate mythology that collects around clinical techniques. Psychotherapists tend to isolate themselves to a greater extent than workers in any other clinical specialty. Therefore, ordinary theoretical and clinical findings are rarely communicated. “Theory is nonsense with these children,” goes one view, “only courage and intuition can help them.” Another well-known leader has it: “I guess it really doesn't matter what interpretation I offer my therapists. Anything will do as long as it relieves the therapist's anxieties.”

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.