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PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Blanck, G. (1969-1970). Response to Dr. Menaker's Discussion. Psychoanal. Rev., 56D(4):552-555.

(1969-1970). Psychoanalytic Review, 56D(4):552-555

Response to Dr. Menaker's Discussion

Gertrude Blanck, Ph.D.

The purpose of my paper was to pose a technical issue of current interest in a way that would enable psychotherapists to examine more sharply the philosophical and theoretical rationale behind their technical procedures. My invitation to scientific debate does not impose the requirement of accepting my position. It would have been specious, however, had I withheld my own views. Because I included them, Dr. Menaker designates the whole as a “position paper.” Opportunity for meaningful debate is diminished by such slanting, for, had she grappled with the issue as posed, even in considered disagreement, her discussion could have constituted an appreciable contribution in the form of clarification of the philosophy of another point of view.

It is difficult to respond to Dr. Menaker's discussion because, by such slanting and some raising of false and peripheral issues, the main point is obscured. “Position paper,” “dichotomy,” “old ghost,” are straw men which must be swept away in order to reclarify the real issue.

On the body-mind problem: From an implication contained in the introductory part of my paper, far from the main subject, one may laboriously construe that I raise “the old ghost of the body-mind problem.” That it is not my subject matter does not negate that it could well be the subject of an important paper. Though it be old and ghostly, it haunts us still. If Dr. Menaker knows the final answer to the body-mind problem, such a paper would be most welcome to the scientific world.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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