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Markewich, M. (1974). Psychiatric Case Studies: Treatment, Drugs, and Outcome. Donald F. Klein with the collaboration of Alfreda Howard. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1972. 491 pp.. Psychoanal. Rev., 61(2):325-326.

(1974). Psychoanalytic Review, 61(2):325-326

Psychiatric Case Studies: Treatment, Drugs, and Outcome. Donald F. Klein with the collaboration of Alfreda Howard. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1972. 491 pp.

Review by:
Maurice Markewich

The authors of this book argue that psychiatric diagnosis is both possible and necessary. They discuss psychiatric diagnosis, long-term prognosis, treatment indications, and therapeutic response. Each section deals with a specific diagnostic subgroup and uses extensive definitions and illustrative case histories, much of the data derived from studies conducted at Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y. No review can do justice to these valuable, detailed clinical case histories. As Jonathan Cole writes in the foreword, they “relate past history, present illness and ongoing treatment attempts to treatment response and eventual outcome.”

There are excellent discussions of thought-process disorders, the use of ECT in psychotic patients refractory to phenothiazines, obsessive-compulsive reactions, various types of depression, the need to rediagnose in the face of continued therapeutic failure, the ysteroid dysphoric character, the premorbid personality, the “myth that phenothiazines usually exacerbate depression,” the “unsubstantiated bland assumption … that psychotherapy is … incompatible with … medication,” akathisia versus anxiety, and “pseudo-schizophrenic neurosis.”

Many fascinating ideas are presented, such as that “thorazine has a markedly activating value for retarded, perplexed schizo-affectives” and that “panic attacks leading to phobic dependent manipulations often occur in a context of recent, severe endocrine fluctuations, and … can be terminated by Tofranil.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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