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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Somerstein, L. (2004). September 11: Trauma and Human Bonds. Edited by Susan W. Coates, Jane L. Rosenthal, and Daniel S. Schechter. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press (Volume 23 in the Relational Perspectives Book Series), 2003, 293 pp.. Psychoanal. Rev., 91(5):717-720.

(2004). Psychoanalytic Review, 91(5):717-720

September 11: Trauma and Human Bonds. Edited by Susan W. Coates, Jane L. Rosenthal, and Daniel S. Schechter. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press (Volume 23 in the Relational Perspectives Book Series), 2003, 293 pp.

Review by:
Lynn Somerstein

Just as Susan Coates, Jane Rosenthal, and Daniel Schechter were preparing to hold a conference about trauma and human bonds, the catastrophic events of September 11th erupted into contemporary American history. The authors changed their focus to include current events. The book September 11: Trauma and Human Bonds that came out of that conference, is a collection of multidisciplinary studies of the emotional effects of trauma and of the attack on the World Trade Center.

As I began reading their study, I suddenly found myself hyper-alert and breathing fast. I was in the midst of remembering wars I have known about and experienced, both the private wars of people surviving belligerent and dangerous families and individual events, and the more public wars of the Middle East and elsewhere. I remembered what it had been like to work together with the NPAP community after 9/11. We had been suffused with fear and terror and the inescapable smell of those horrible burning buildings and of people becoming wraiths. We sought comfort from one another and turned our own terrors into energy to help. We offered psychotherapeutic first aid at our brownstone on West 13th Street and in psychoanalysts' homes and offices in the days and weeks after September 11th. We reviewed the literature on trauma and taught one another and ourselves what to do amidst this public grief. Daniel Herman, Barbara Pape Aaron, and Ezra Susser, authors of the chapter “An Agenda for Public Mental Health in a time of Terror,” confirmed that the emergency counseling provided ad hoc by volunteers had a beneficial impact on the citizens of New York.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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