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Fonda, P. (2017). The Mind at War. Rom. J. Psychoanal., 10(2):135-156.
    

(2017). Romanian Journal of Psychoanalysis, 10(2):135-156

Applied Psychoanalysis

The Mind at War

Paolo Fonda

(Accepted for publication 21 of January, 2017)

A war mindset in humans seems to coincide with the paranoid-schizoid position. In war also, groups regress to PS. Some symptoms of such a regression were evident also in Freud himself when WW1 started. The 20th century was the bloodiest century in recorded history and its enormous traumas have gathered and overloaded humanity. Its traumatic legacy included also unbearable feelings of those who killed other humans and the voids left in the group fabric by millions of deads.

Unworked through war traumas with such contents of death and destruction lie split and silent stored in the minds of millions of individuals, constituting fragments of a secret parallel life. They are so similar that spread throughout the psychism of the group, where “mine, yours, his” all blend into “ours”. With their vibrations they form a mute chorus that converge into the background soundtrack of the group's mental life. How may all this have contributed to create so extremely destructive paranoid positions like communism, fascism, or Nazism were?

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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