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Strachey, J. (1966). Freud's Use of the Concept of Regression, Appendix A to Project for a Scientific Psychology. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume I ( 1886-1899): Pre-Psycho-Analytic Publications and Unpublished Drafts, 344-346.

Strachey, J. (1966). [SEA344a1]Freud's Use of the Concept of Regression, Appendix A to Project for a Scientific Psychology. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume I ( 1886-1899): Pre-Psycho-Analytic Publications and Unpublished Drafts, 344-346

[SEA344a1]Freud's Use of the Concept of Regression, Appendix A to Project for a Scientific Psychology Book Information Previous Up Next

James Strachey

[SEA344a2]The concept of regression, foreshadowed in the last two sections of Part I of the Project, was to play an increasingly important part in Freud's theories.

[SEA344a3]In a footnote added in 1914 to Chapter VII (B) of The Interpretation of Dreams (Standard Ed., 5, 542), Freud himself traced back the idea of regression to the thirteenth-century scholastic philosopher Albertus Magnus and to Hobbes's Leviathan (1651). But he seems to have derived it more directly from Breuer's theoretical contribution to Studies on Hysteria (Standard Ed., 2, 189), published only a few months before he himself wrote the present work. Breuer there described the retrogressive movement of an excitation from an idea or mnemic image back to a perception (or hallucination) in almost exactly the same way as Freud does here. Both writers used the same word ‘rückläufig’, which is here translated ‘retrogressive’.

[SEA344a4]The actual German word ‘Regression’ appeared first, so far as we know, (in a similar connection) some eighteen months later than this in a draft sent to Fliess on May 2, 1897 (Draft L, p. 250 above). But its first publication was in The Interpretation of Dreams (1900a), in the passage to which the footnote quoted at the beginning of this Appendix was subsequently attached.

[SEA344a5]As time went on, the term came to be used in a variety of ways, which were at one point classified by Freud as ‘topographical’, ‘temporal’ and ‘formal’.

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