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Strachey, J. (1966). General Preface. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume I ( 1886-1899): Pre-Psycho-Analytic Publications and Unpublished Drafts, xiii-xxvi.

Strachey, J. (1966). [SEAxiiia1]General Preface. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume I ( 1886-1899): Pre-Psycho-Analytic Publications and Unpublished Drafts, xiii-xxvi

[SEAxiiia1]General Preface Book Information Previous Up Next

James Strachey

[SEAxiiia2](1) The Scope of the Standard Edition

[SEAxiiia3]The ground covered by this edition is shown by its title—The Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud; but it is right that I should begin by indicating its contents more explicitly. My aim has been to include in it the whole of Freud's published psychological writings—that is, both the psycho-analytic and the pre-psycho-analytic. It does not include Freud's numerous publications on the physical sciences during the first fifteen years or so of his productive activity. I have been fairly liberal in drawing the line here, for I have found a place for two or three works produced by Freud immediately after his return from Paris in 1886. These, dealing chiefly with hysteria, were written under the influence of Charcot, with scarcely a reference to mental processes; but they provide a real bridge between Freud's neurological and psychological writings.

[SEAxiiia4]The Standard Edition does not include Freud's correspondence. This is of enormous extent and only relatively small selections from it have been published hitherto. Apart from ‘Open Letters’ and a few others printed with Freud's assent during his lifetime, my main exception to this general rule is in the case of his correspondence with Wilhelm Fliess during the early part of his career. This is of such vital importance to an understanding of Freud's views (and not only of his early ones) that much of it could not possibly be rejected.

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