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Freud, S. (1914). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, August 14, 1914. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 11.

Freud, S. (1914). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, August 14, 1914. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 11

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, August 14, 1914 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, August 14, 19141

Dear friend,

I am attempting it with a card.2 What are you doing? Where are you? We have been together in Vienna since the 5th of the month,3 except for Martin, who voluntarily enlisted in Salzburg,4 and Annerl, who is cut off in England. I am lacking all concentration for work. These are hard times, our interests depreciated, for the time being.

Kind regards.

Yours,

Freud

Notes to "Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, August 14, 1914"

1 Postcard.

2 This card is addressed to Budapest, with the instruction “Nachsenden!” (Forward!) added in Freud's handwriting.

3 See Freud's letter of August 6, 1914, to Sophie and Max Halberstadt (Library of Congress): Also, in Karlsbad we couldn't comprehend the total seriousness of the situation, either. But Aunt Minna and Mathilde, who had already returned to Vienna earlier, gave us no peace until we departed on the evening of Tuesday the 4th with the last evening train that was even permitted to run The impressions of these two days can't be put into a letter.

4 Freud's son Martin had, shortly beforehand, enlisted in Salzburg, where he was employed by the court, and finally managed to get himself called up despite his earlier determination to be declared unfit for military service (see letter 195 and n. 4 and letter 272).

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