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Ferenczi, S. (1915). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, September 15, 1915. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 80.

Ferenczi, S. (1915). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, September 15, 1915. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 80

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, September 15, 1915 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Pápa, September 15, 1915

Dear Professor,

After an absence of three weeks (which immediately followed the trip to Vienna and Graz), I am finally settled again in Pápa. My theory that all libido is based on “naches”1 explains why I now feel better here than before. Incidentally, the plans for my transfer have not yet been laid to rest. This time Privy Councillor Moravcsik2 has stepped in on my behalf. I spoke with the latter—unfortunately—on a sad occasion. A brother (Joseph, 46 years old),3 bookseller in Nyiregyháza, who in his youth underwent a manic period that lasted a year and a half, fell ill with melancholic depression after a three-year period of remission. I hastened to place him in Moravcsik's clinic, and I am hoping for a favorable course of the illness. I must add that, in my opinion, the patient was slightly hypomanic during the whole “healthy” time.

I am looking forward to be able to see you soon. I reiterate that you should combine Pápa and Budapest; Budapest is more beautiful in the fall than in the spring, when you have seen it.

The favorable news about your family—especially about Anna and Oli—is very, very gratifying. I share your optimism regarding the future of both.

The trip to Hamburg at this time must be doubly interesting. Bring us fresh—and very good news, and give my regards to your loved ones there.

Kind regards,

Ferenczi

Notes to "Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, September 15, 1915"

1 Yiddish for “pleasure.”

2 See letter 203 and n. 1.

3 József Ferenczi, (1869-?), bachelor, lover of music, who took charge of the Nyiregyháza branch of the Ferenczi book dealership.

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