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Freud, S. (1915). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, October 31, 1915. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 85-87.

Freud, S. (1915). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, October 31, 1915. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 85-87

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, October 31, 1915 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, October 31, 1915 IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

I force myself to write today in order to divert myself, and will begin with the assurance that I have taken note of your tasty scientific menu with a distinct watering of the mouth. I would like to recommend for the form of publication that you stick the whole thing in the next volume of the Jahrbuch and publish it simultaneously as a book, which will be easy and means a double honorarium. You know that Jung did it the same way.1 It is, of course, predicated on our getting Deuticke to publish a new volume of the Jahrbuch at the right time, and there is nothing there for him but my big case history and a paper by Abraham.2 We can then see how it goes with yours.

I don't know how long it has been since I last wrote to you, and for that reason I am in danger of repeating news. I think it was on October 17. So I probably told you that Martin was here for half a day. Since then he has been writing from peace and quiet between palms and magnolias, so probably Riva Arco, etc. On the other hand, I probably didn't mention to you that my very dear patient from your vicinity (Herény bei Szombathely) died of typhus and that I was deprived of another one, a young man from Bremen, by the last German call-up. Accordingly, my activity is very modest. My mornings are almost completely free. In all this leisure I have decided to inaugurate the lectures,3 and on October 23 and 30 I found myself facing a college of about seventy persons, among them two daughters and a daughter-in-law.4

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