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Ferenczi, S. (1916). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, November 13, 1916. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 151-152.

Ferenczi, S. (1916). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, November 13, 1916. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 151-152

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, November 13, 1916 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest, November 13, 1916
Grand Hôtel Royal
Nagyszálloda

Dear Professor,

I already wanted to let the drying out of my inkwell serve as an excuse for the further postponement of letter writing; but it occurred to me that this drying out is itself a symptom, and therefore useless as an explanation. So, I am writing—if only with lead.1

I am going—to tell you the most onerous things right away—through tormenting times. Initially only psychically—but for some time the affects have again found their way to corporeality. (Accentuation of the Basedow symptoms. Breathing disturbances one-two times a night.)

Externally the situation is such that Gizella is letting out her (ucs.) revenge on me in the form of answering my now honestly intended offer of marriage with the senseless consideration that she must first be assured of Elma's future in America and await her return home.

It is not uninteresting—and speaks in favor of the correctness of your interpretations—, that I first reacted to this with symptoms—and not with anger. The symptoms are therefore certainly substitute gratifications. (Identification with Géza?) Gradually, however, the symptoms proved to be no longer capable of bearing the load, and Frau G. has to bear wild and passionate outbreaks from me. I recognize in them the (at the time suppressed) outbreaks of rage against my mother, whom I loved in vain.

Frau G.'s refusal is thus at least good to the extent that my analysis can be deepened by it.

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