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Freud, S. (1917). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, May 14, 1917. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 202.

Freud, S. (1917). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, May 14, 1917. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 202

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, May 14, 1917 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, May 14, 1917
IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

I count your news that you have reported back again so fresh in all your relations among the most hopeful. That makes the impression of a final settlement.

A registered bread shipment arrived this morning. I was already reminded twice (on the same day!) by my wife to confirm that to you with thanks. The unheard-of large postage should be registered here, according to her suggestion. I am in suspense as to how long the foul deception will go on. In any case, warmest thanks to you and your secret helper for more than the postage! Today there was added joy in being able to give Sophie a piece for the journey. They just steamed off at 9:40 in the sleeping car. The child was charming, as if he understood the situation. Now things will get lonely. Fontes Melusinae1 at the beginning, as at the end of the cycle.

The only thing new here is the Zeitschrift. Sachs is great, but Heller and everything that touches him a difficult trial.

Let me hear more soon.

Cordially,

Freud

Notes to "Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, May 14, 1917"

1 Melusine (meaning “sweet as honey”), the heroine of a fairy tale of Celtic origin, who, as the daughter of a king and a sea nymph, on certain days had to assume the shape of a fish or a water sprite.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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