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Freud, S. (1917). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, June 22, 1917. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 222-223.

Freud, S. (1917). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, June 22, 1917. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 222-223

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, June 22, 1917 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, June 22, 1917
IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

Enclosed the letter from Groddeck, which arrived today.1 You will certainly find, as I have, that it is somewhat tiring, that the patient could have made things easier for the doctor if he had communicated the conclusions instead of the material, and that a good piece of complacency is required for this action. In the meantime, but the impression on the whole: laudabiliter se subjecit.2

At the end of the letter he directly solicits a statement from you, which remains left for you to grant him.

Here at the beginning of the last week before the journey of discovery into the Tatra. Quiet, gloomy times. Anna has completed an otitis media,3 which has harmlessly run its course, without suppuration, which your friend Neumann4 has very kindly treated.

Fate is on the best path to cure me of my best vice.5 But I would like to say, like Francis Bacon: I won't be plucked of my feathers.6

You are certainly still very busy.

Kind regards,

Freud

Notes to "Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, June 22, 1917"

1 Published in part in Freud/Groddeck, pp. 38-41.

2 “Auctor laudabiliter se subjecit”: Latin for “the author has subjected himself in a praiseworthy fashion.” A sentence appended to a book by the Catholic Index Congregation to indicate that an author has recanted his work after it has been declared dangerous or questionable.

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