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Freud, S. (1918). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, February 10, 1918. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 262-263.

Freud, S. (1918). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, February 10, 1918. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 262-263

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, February 10, 1918 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, February 10, 1918
IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

I am replying to you immediately because you asked me to, even though there is nothing new to report from us. Many thanks for your inquiries. Minna thinks the prices in Balatonföred are really too high, and I, too, must admit that Csorba would be given up by us if it turned out to be over thirty crowns. We hope to learn soon whether this is the case, and will inquire in the event of a failure in our being notified.

All the members of the family are averse to staying in the vicinity of Budapest. They are of the opinion that it will be neither more beautiful nor more comfortable, nor less expensive than in the vicinity of Vienna, and will instead be more replete with travel difficulties and language differences. I, too, find I am not inclined toward this decision. I would maintain as desirable being together with you (that is, you and Frau Gisela Ferenczi), but I don't see at the moment where this can be realized. It would be very hard to find a promised land this summer, even in Hungary. I am inclined to leave everything to later impressions and incentives, which can, of course, lead to lack of shelter for the holidays. In the event of continued disintegration of society, traveling, taking along baggage, leaving the house, will easily become altogether impossible.—

Abraham is very delighted by your essay on the pathoneuroses and declares it to be the best thing that you have written up to now. He also knows Schultz, whom you reviewed; he is very intelligent but devoid of all moral qualities.1 I am still not in agreement with your intention to publish the three works (Pathoneuroses—Stigmata—Hysterical Materialization Phenomena) separately. First of all, I would not like to rob the Zeitschrift; second, I would not like to give up hope of continuing it.

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