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Ferenczi, S. (1919). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, December 26, 1919. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 377-379.

Ferenczi, S. (1919). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, December 26, 1919. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 377-379

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, December 26, 1919 Book Information Previous Up

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest, December 26, 1919

Dear Professor,

1.) Status of the fund matter:

On the 24th Mayor Bódy received us (Béla Lévy and me). The audience was brief. He read aloud to us his letter directed to Toni, a copy of which I had already read; then the “report” of Dr. Wenhardt—director of the municipal Rochus Hospital.1 The report, approximately one and a half typewritten pages all told, was nothing but a quotation of Hoche's statements (sect, danger, etc.). The mayor said that he didn't mention this report in the letter to Toni because he wanted to spare the sick man. But on no account does that mean that he—as Toni indicates in his letter to him—has already made a favorable decision.—But in the end he assumed a somewhat more amicable tone; he is naturally inclined—so he says—rather to go along with the intentions which the creator of the fund “has taken into his head” (sic!). Only he has to cover himself and determine whether it has to do with appropriate goals. So I should submit a rejoinder. He also intends to ask others.—I told him: perhaps also Privy Councillor Moravcsik. Thereupon we parted.

Dr. Béla Lévy was shocked. He still didn't know that scientifically responsible men were capable of making such judgments without appropriate experience, as Hoche does. For that reason he asked me if I was so completely convinced by your teachings. I denied him an answer, from which he was able to surmise the nonsensical nature of the question and begged my pardon.—

In the afternoon I went to Moravcsik. I found him “buttoned up.”

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