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Jung, C.G. (1910). Letter from C. G. Jung to Sigmund Freud, April 6, 1910. The Freud/Jung Letters: The Correspondence Between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung, 304-305.

Jung, C.G. (1910). Letter from C. G. Jung to Sigmund Freud, April 6, 1910. The Freud/Jung Letters: The Correspondence Between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung, 304-305

Letter from C. G. Jung to Sigmund Freud, April 6, 1910 Book Information Previous Up Next

C. G. Jung

184 J

Dear Professor Freud, Küsnach-Zürich, 6 April 1910

This time I'm settling down quickly to a letter so as not to give the devil a chance to conduct his well-known time-extending experiments. I have reluctantly let Honegger go to his sanatorium in Territet;1 now my libido is thrashing around for a suitable object. Riklin will in some measure replace the temporary loss. Nuremberg did him a lot of good and he is coming much closer to me than before. All the same I won't let go of Honegger, and will do everything in my power to carry out this plan.2

Nothing new to report yet about the International Psychoanalytic Association. The notice for the Jahrbuch has gone off to Deuticke. Proofs have begun to arrive so we can hope for early publication. As soon as term begins our local group will put itself in order.

As a perseveration from America I am still reading the interesting book by Maurice Low, The American People, A Study in National Psychology.3 He holds the climate largely responsible for the frequency of neurosis in America.4 There must be something in it, for it is really too weird that the Indians were unable to populate that fertile country more densely. Low thinks the colossal differences of temperature between summer and winter are to blame. Perhaps a harshly continental climate really is ill-suited to a race sprung from the sea. “Something is wrong,”5 as Low says.

When I have fulfilled this duty (the reading of this book) I shall return to the overflowing delights of mythology, which I always reserve as dessert for the evening.

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