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Freud, S. (1910). Letter from Sigmund Freud to C. G. Jung, October 23, 1910. The Freud/Jung Letters: The Correspondence Between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung, 360-362.

Freud, S. (1910). Letter from Sigmund Freud to C. G. Jung, October 23, 1910. The Freud/Jung Letters: The Correspondence Between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung, 360-362

Letter from Sigmund Freud to C. G. Jung, October 23, 1910 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

216 F

23 October 1910, Vienna, IX. Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

After my own wallowing in nature and antiquity, I can hardly begrudge you your trip, but I am very glad you are within reach again. I have all sorts of things to tell you.

First you will be interested to hear about Bleuler. The nerve-contact I have made with him led to a copious correspondence1 and I am just now answering one of his letters. It is difficult with him, his arguments

The Zentralblatt: cover of first issue. See 216 F

are so vague that I can't pin him down; and if I were to point out his secret motives it would only antagonize him. He does nothing but skirmish with indirect statements. He has expressed a desire for an interview. Since he adds that he cannot get away before Easter when the next Congress is presumably to be held, I offered to go to Zürich during the Christmas holidays if he holds out some hope of an understanding. My position is that he is no more indispensable than anyone else, but that his loss would be regrettable and would widen the gulf between us and the others. Consequently it is worth a sacrifice to hold him, of what I don't know yet, certainly not of the Association which we have been at so much pains to found and which is destined to do great things. There is an enormous disproportion between his objections to our procedure and the conclusions he draws from them. And he fills in the gap with imponderables and unintelligibles. But he seems to court my good opinion, he believes in the cause and doesn't want to break with us.

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