Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Chused, J.F. (1990). Chapter 3: How Clinical Work with Children Can Inform the Therapist of Adults. Child and Adolescent Analysis: Its Significance for Clinical Work with Adults, 37-54.

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

OpenAthens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

Chused, J.F. (1990). Chapter 3: How Clinical Work with Children Can Inform the Therapist of Adults. Child and Adolescent Analysis: Its Significance for Clinical Work with Adults , 37-54

Chapter 3: How Clinical Work with Children Can Inform the Therapist of Adults Book Information Previous Up Next

Judith Fingert Chused, M.D.

In this volume we are reversing a process that began many years ago. Child psychoanalysis developed out of analytic work with adults; here we are considering the opposite, the contributions child analysis can make to adult analysis and to other forms of clinical work with adults. Many of the therapeutic principles that I shall discuss, principles of technique which are essential in working with children, developed because of failures of adult analytic techniques in child analysis. Failures led to new ways of thinking and the development of new techniques. I am hopeful that the theoretical and technical advances in child analysis which have enhanced work with children will also prove useful with adult patients.

Looking back to the early nineteen hundreds, when children who “wanted to get back to [their] toys” (Ferenczi, 1913, p. 244) and therapists who wanted to talk seemed to work at cross-purposes, the problems in that early work are evident. Children were expected to comply with the therapist's strategy, to talk about ideas they had not yet begun to consider. We are

- 37 -

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2017, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.