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Negri, R. Harris, M. (2007). The Story of Infant Development: Observational Work with Martha Harris. Karnac Books Ltd..

Negri, R. and Harris, M. (2007). The Story of Infant Development. , 1-235. Karnac Books Ltd..

The Story of Infant Development: Observational Work with Martha Harris

Romana Negri and Martha Harris

Edited by:
Meg Harris Williams

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ix
ABOUT THE AUTHORS xi
EDITORIAL NOTE by Meg Harris Williams xiii
PREFACE by Gianna Polacco Williams xv
INTRODUCTION by Romana Negri xvii
CHAPTER ONE: The pattern of normal development: forming a relationship with the breast 1
A stunning experience; a state of normal non-integration and evacuation of sensations; the pull of the nipple; maternal depression and the difficulty of introjecting the object; digesting emotions; problems of identification in the mother; the breast that comes and goes away; the bottle, and a distance from the mother.  
CHAPTER TWO: The pattern of normal development: the end of breastfeeding 35
The end of breastfeeding; feelings of aggression and seduction; representations of the breast; the lost breast and the nipple lifeline; mother returns to work—the new sweetheart; the only baby; the relationship with the father; how the new baby is made; the little chair—the new place in the family.  
CHAPTER THREE: The story of the birth of the next sibling 89
Feminine and masculine qualities; the value of fairy tales; the epistemophilic instinct; one day it will be his turn; a point of “catastrophic change”; birth of the next sibling; the “imbecile” infantile self that damages its objects; the second day at nursery school (with Donald Meltzer); the third birthday.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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