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1. 
Lee, Z. Palmer, S. Birksted-Breen, D. Humble, C. (2020). The Enigma of the Hour - The International Journal of Psychoanalysis Centenary Exhibition. Int. J. Psycho-Anal. Video Collection, 1(1):5.
 

This exhibition in Freud's last home marks the centenary of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis founded by Ernest Jones under the direction of Sigmund Freud. The enigma of the hour, the analytic hour, an hour both timeless and strictly bound by time, the search for an answer which can never be fully found. In Freud's consulting room, temporality, the temporality of the unconscious, the intermingling and interlacing of past, present, and future is an overriding theme. Rhythm, reverberation, resonance, a play between words and objects, sensations, emotions with no words, the disjunction between words and experience.

2. 
Lachmann, F.M. (2020). Frank M. Lachmann on ‘Violations of Expectations in Creativity and Perversion’ (Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 2006). PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):31.
 

Frank Lachmann draws on his experience of infant research and observation to make connections between violations of expectations in creativity and in perversion. He explains how the phenomenon of mass or serial murder can be illuminated by consideration of the perpetrators’ experiences of having their expectations violated in childhood, and also shows that violation of expectations is central to the experience of many works of art, taking examples from film and music. He gives an illustration of how violation of expectations can play a productive role in a psychoanalytic treatment.

3. 
Civitarese, G. (2020). Giuseppe Civitarese on ‘“Caesura” as Bion’s Discourse on Method’ (IJP, 2008). PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):32.
 

Giuseppe Civitarese discusses the influence of Descartes’ method of radical doubt on Bion’s approach to psychoanalytic inquiry and its links with Bion’s concept of caesura. He argues that Bion’s work seeks to bring about a change in psychoanalytic method, from a technique of decoding to a means of enhancing the patient’s capacity to dream reality, and he stresses the importance of attunement with the patient to enable psychic growth. He links the shift in Bion’s way of thinking about the aims and methods of analysis to his shift to a more aesthetic mode of presentation of his ideas.

4. 
Blum, H. (2020). Harold P. Blum on ‘Psychoanalytic Reconstruction and Reintegration’ (Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 2005). PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):30.
 

Harold P. Blum describes the origins of his interest in reconstruction and gives an example of a particular case where reconstructing the patient’s history was essential to understanding the split in his identity and helping him to achieve reintegration. He considers some of the reasons for the relative lack of emphasis on reconstruction in contemporary psychoanalysis and discusses some of the issues the analyst needs to consider in using reconstruction with traumatized patients.

5. 
Harris, .E. (2020). Adrienne E. Harris on ‘You Must Remember This’ (Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 2009). PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):29.
 

Adrienne Harris discusses the subjectivity of the analyst in relation to situations of impasse in psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance to clinical momentum is approached via an examination of the analyst’s omnipotence. Reflecting on the early formation and motivation of the analyst to provide care, the implications of this defensive structure are observed both positively and as a potential block to psychic motility and mourning in both patient and analyst. She stresses the importance of acknowledging and addressing the analyst’s vulnerability both within the countertransference and the wider professional community.

6. 
Emde, , R.N. Isserow, PhD, , J. (2019). Making Connections with Bob N. Emde. PEP Video Grants, 1(3):14.
 

In this interview, Robert Emde, Professor of Psychiatry Emeritus, University of Colorado School of Medicine, speaks candidly about his proudest achievement of a career spanning five decades. Surprisingly, he does not identify a piece of his own research or a particular piece of his own writing. Rather, he looks at how he enabled personal and theoretical connections to be made around attachment theory which culminated in seminal writings by other authors in the Monograph Series. In characteristic modestly, Bob clearly narrates this journey along with its significant implications for psychoanalysis.

7. 
Mason, A. (2018). Albert Mason on ‘Bion and Binocular Vision’. PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):28.
 

Albert Mason describes how he came to know Bion, his experience of supervision with him, and explains how the two of them came to move to Los Angeles. He discusses the significance of Bion’s military experiences for his work and reflects on the reasons for Bion’s introduction of the concept of O.

8. 
Chodorow, N. (2018). Nancy J. Chodorow on ‘The American Independent Tradition: Loewald, Erikson, and the (Possible) Rise of Intersubjective Ego Psychology’. PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):23.
 

Nancy J. Chodorow argues that there is a trend within American psychoanalysis that can be characterized as an American Independent tradition analogous to the British Independent tradition, although there are some differences. She proposes that one way of describing this tradition is as an intersubjective ego psychology and explains how her view of intersubjectivity differs from the common contemporary understanding of intersubjectivity as a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. She discusses the significance of the work of Loewald and Erikson in articulating the American Independent tradition.

9. 
Kernberg, O. (2018). Otto Kernberg on ‘Institutional Problems of Psychoanalytic Education’. PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):24.
 

Otto Kernberg describes the experiences that led him to develop his theory about the institutional problems of psychoanalytic education. He explains how transference and countertransference in closed institutions tend to produce authoritarian institutional structures, gives some reasons for the difficulties analysts have had in reflecting on this problem, and considers the extent to which the situation has improved since he first began to highlight the problem.

10. 
Celenza, A. (2018). Andrea Celenza on "The Threat of Male to Female Erotic Transference". PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):22.
 

Andrea Celenza considers the reasons for the historical neglect of male-to-female erotic transference and links this neglect to the chronic desexualization of psychoanalytic theorizing. She discusses how the shift to psychoanalysis as a two-person and multi-character phenomenon is implicated, including in particular the desexualization of the maternal (erotic) transference, while also making the task of analyzing erotic transferences (and their transformations) more complex. She considers the emergence of multiple erotic transferences as a nongendered, vital part of analyses and discusses the importance of consultation in safeguarding the asymmetric treatment frame.

11. 
Lear, J. (2018). Jonathan Lear on ‘Wisdom Won from Illness: The Psychoanalytic Grasp of Human Being’. PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):26.
 

Jonathan Lear shows how the work of key writers in the Western philosophical tradition can illuminate our understanding of the process of change in psychoanalysis. He explains the distinction between theoretical and practical wisdom and its relevance to psychoanalysis using a detailed clinical example and discusses the significance of free association in facilitating the process of change.

12. 
Fonagy, P. (2018). Peter Fonagy on ‘Playing With Reality: I. Theory of Mind and the Normal Development of Psychic Reality’. PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1(1):27.
 

Peter Fonagy discusses the influence of developmental science on his formulation of the concepts of psychic equivalence, the pretend mode and mentalization. He considers the relationship of these concepts with classical psychoanalytic concepts and explores their clinical utility. He addresses the question of the aim of psychoanalytic treatment and the relationship of the concept of mentalizing with theories of conflict..

13. 
Young-Bruehl, E. Duckler, G. (2016). On Childism by Elisabeth Young-Bruehl: Lecture, March 26, 2011. PEP Videostream, 1(1):24.
 

This is the last-known lecture of Elisabeth Young-Bruehl. In it, she outlines her observations and theoretical understanding of how children have been subjected to a long-standing (and in many ways, unconscious) prejudice. This systemic and cultural prejudice shares many similarities with ways in which minorities, women and LGBQT members have been seen and treated as objects that serve functions for others rather than people in their own right.

14. 
White, C. Palmer, R. Davies, W. (2017). Being There. PEP Video Grants, 1(2):13.
 

Being There is an observational documentary following women supporting vulnerable and isolated new mums in Alexandra, a poor and overcrowded area in Johannesburg. The women, all mothers themselves, work as home visitors for Ububele, an infant mental health charity in South Africa. They tirelessly offer support to new mothers in their township, helping them to develop strong, sensitive relationships with their children, and to help these newborns reach their potential, despite their circumstances. The film demonstrates how psychoanalytic ideas can be applied in innovative and radical ways to address pressing and major global health and social problems.

15. 
(2017). Irma Brenman Pick on her 80th birthday: British Psychoanalytic Society Scientific Meeting. Instit. Psa UK AV Proj. Videostream, 1(1):16.
 

Irma Brenman Pick is a Distinguished Fellow, Supervising and Training Analyst and former President of the British Psychoanalytical Society. In this video she talks with Michael Brearley about her experience of prejudice in 1950s London. She goes on to share her memories of Esther Bick, Herbert Rosenfeld, Wilfred Bion and Melanie Klein, and their influence on her psychoanalytic practice. The event took place in June 2015 and was organised by the British Psychoanalytical Society.

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